• headland official seal 200x200

    City of Headland

    Gem of the Wiregrass

    headland official seal 200x200  

    City of Headland

    Gem of the Wiregrass

  • headland official seal 200x200

    City of Headland

    Gem of the Wiregrass

    headland official seal 200x200  

    City of Headland

    Gem of the Wiregrass

  • headland official seal 200x200

    City of Headland

    Gem of the Wiregrass

    headland official seal 200x200  

    City of Headland

    Gem of the Wiregrass

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Governor Bob RileyGov. Bob Riley has awarded nearly $1.4 million in grants for improvement projects in Ozark, Headland and Cottonwood. Riley awarded a $500,000 grant to Headland and a $399,586 grant to Cottonwood to improve sewer systems in those towns. A $488,476 grant to Ozark will fund a plan to revitalize one of the city’s main corridors. The three grants are part of the Community Development Block Grant program.

“In today’s difficult economy, there are many vital projects that local governments are unable to undertake without assistance,” Riley said. “I am pleased we are able to help these cities improve the quality of life for residents.”

Headland will replace a sewer line and pumping station serving about 735 households in the city’s central and north sections. Broken clay sewer lines and an undersized, outdated pumping system have contributed to sewage backup in the neighborhood, especially during heavy rains. Local funding of $141,946 has been pledged for the project.

Cottonwood plans to rehabilitate or replace a main sewer line and four sewage pump stations. Leaking pipes and faulty pumps have resulted in sewage backup along the sewer line route. Heavy rains also penetrate the lines adding to the amount of effluent that must be treated at the wastewater plant and increasing the cost of operations. The town has pledged local funding of $44,398.

Ozark will tear down dilapidated structures and assist low- and moderate-income residents, along South Union Avenue to make their houses more livable and energy efficient. The city also will resurface the avenue and provide $87,500 in local funding for the project.
Riley notified Mayors Ray Marler of Headline, Lomax Smith of Cottonwood and William Blackwell of Ozark that the grants had been awarded.

adecaShieldFunding for the grants was made available to the state through a program of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grants.

The CDBG program was created in 1974 to improve living conditions primarily for low- and moderate-income residents. Projects may include infrastructure improvements, housing rehabilitation, construction of senior and community centers and economic development programs.

Governor Bob RileyGov. Bob Riley has awarded nearly $1.4 million in grants for improvement projects in Ozark, Headland and Cottonwood. Riley awarded a $500,000 grant to Headland and a $399,586 grant to Cottonwood to improve sewer systems in those towns. A $488,476 grant to Ozark will fund a plan to revitalize one of the city’s main corridors. The three grants are part of the Community Development Block Grant program.

“In today’s difficult economy, there are many vital projects that local governments are unable to undertake without assistance,” Riley said. “I am pleased we are able to help these cities improve the quality of life for residents.”

Headland will replace a sewer line and pumping station serving about 735 households in the city’s central and north sections. Broken clay sewer lines and an undersized, outdated pumping system have contributed to sewage backup in the neighborhood, especially during heavy rains. Local funding of $141,946 has been pledged for the project.

Cottonwood plans to rehabilitate or replace a main sewer line and four sewage pump stations. Leaking pipes and faulty pumps have resulted in sewage backup along the sewer line route. Heavy rains also penetrate the lines adding to the amount of effluent that must be treated at the wastewater plant and increasing the cost of operations. The town has pledged local funding of $44,398.

Ozark will tear down dilapidated structures and assist low- and moderate-income residents, along South Union Avenue to make their houses more livable and energy efficient. The city also will resurface the avenue and provide $87,500 in local funding for the project.
Riley notified Mayors Ray Marler of Headline, Lomax Smith of Cottonwood and William Blackwell of Ozark that the grants had been awarded.

adecaShieldFunding for the grants was made available to the state through a program of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grants.

The CDBG program was created in 1974 to improve living conditions primarily for low- and moderate-income residents. Projects may include infrastructure improvements, housing rehabilitation, construction of senior and community centers and economic development programs.